A history of literary journalism

A history of literary journalism

Literary Journalism is a relatively modern form of non-fiction writing. It is unique from other forms of journalism as the writer eschews objectivity and embraces a subjective viewpoint from which he or she will report on events. Famous examples of literary journalism include Hunter S. Thompson’s
‘The Kentucky Derby’ and Truman Capote’s ‘In Cold Blood’.

Pioneers of the genre, such as Thomson and the likes of Tom Wolfe, emerged in the mid-20th century. These were writers keen to push beyond the constricting rule that journalism must strive for objectivity. Objectivity in the mainstream press is a false premise. The values of the press are affected by the money-making direction from corporate ownership, thus making all mainstream print media subjective to its own agenda, while hiding these motives behind a smokescreen of objectivity.

By not claiming to be objective, and embracing the opportunities afforded by subjective reporting, citizen journalists, such as bloggers, are offering honest and exciting news analysis. Video bloggers such as Philip DeFranco have worldwide audiences of millions. By contrast, the mainstream print media with its formulaic approach to news reporting is experiencing declining sales.